Dr. D’s List: The Best Veterinary Websites You Should Bookmark Right Now

I get it.  It’s almost midnight on a Saturday, and you have a question about your pet.  You can’t get a hold of Dr. D or your veterinarian, but you need answers!

 

If you absolutely have to look up some information regarding your pet on the internet, here are some of my favorite (and reliable) resources:

1.  Veterinary Partner

Why I love it:  Veterinary Partner is the place I send my clients when they need more information about their pet’s diagnosis or illness.  The content is written by Veterinarians specifically to educate their clients.  If your pet has recently been diagnosed with an illness, go here first.

P.S.  Also great for questions about small mammals, nutrition, or the meds your vet prescribed.

2.  Vetstreet

Why I love it:  The content is user friendly and often fun.  It’s a great place to go not only for medical questions, but also those weird questions you might have (like, why does my dog turn around 3 times before they lie down?).

P.S.  One of my favorite humorous veterinarians, Dr. Andy Roark, writes for Vetstreet.  His “Conversations With My Cat” video series is hilarious.

3.  Pet Poison Helpline

Why I love it:  This is the go-to place (second only to the emergency clinic) if your pet ingested something and you want to know if it will hurt them.  But please, if they did eat something, just call the emergency clinic first.

P.S.  Also great for planning your spring planting or indoor plants, since you want to make sure you aren’t bringing anything toxic into your pet’s environment.

4.  The Indoor Pet Initiative

Why I love it:  CAT OWNERS, PAY ATTENTION!  This website is an excellent resource for all things kitty – behaviors, proper environment, providing enrichment for your indoor cats, cat-to-cat interactions, and so much more.  Bookmark it, read it, love it.  It is your new best friend.

P.S.  If you are a dog person, you’re not left out of this one.  There is an equally wonderful section just for you.

5.  The Pet Food Institute

Why I love it:  Some of the most common questions I get from clients are regarding what their pets eat.  After I give them my advice, I trust sending them here so they can get all the information they need about proper nutrition and choosing the right diet for their pets.

P.S.  Especially the “Myth Buster” section.

7.  For dog behavior and training, I like these two:

Dr. Sophia Yin – Her work regarding low-stress handling of pets has been instrumental in the Small Things philosophy of veterinary care.

Victoria Stilwell – You know her from TV, but her positive dog training methods are really effective.

 

So there you have it!  These links are Dr. D-tested-and-approved.  Search them to your heart’s content!

But hey, don’t hesitate to call me in the morning.

Ten Things Your Veterinarian Wants You To Know

Recently I was inspired by an article I read on this topic, so I decided to share with you my own list of 10 things I want you to know:

 

Lay some knowledge on me, Doc!

Lay some knowledge on me, Doc!

 

1.  Annual exams are important.

Not only because dogs and cats age much faster than humans (of course you knew that!), but because early detection of disease gives your pet a better chance at a longer life with you.

2.  Dental care is more important than you think.

I know it sounds silly when your vet recommends that you brush your pet’s teeth at home, and you hate the idea of your pet under anesthesia for a proper dental cleaning.  But trust me when I say that when it comes to oral health, an ounce of prevention is truly worth a pound of cure.

If you want to save money on your pets life-long medical care, invest in their teeth NOW, before you have to spend thousands of dollars having all their teeth extracted because they are so diseased, and/or treating their heart/kidney disease that was secondary to their dental disease.  Seriously.

3.  If you love your pet, keep them lean.

Pet obesity in our country rivals the human obesity epidemic.  We are literally loving our pets to death.  An overweight pet has an average life span of TWO YEARS LESS than their healthy counterparts!  Make sure you are feeding your pet the right amount of a high quality food, giving them the right kind of exercise, and not giving them too many treats.  If you don’t know what is appropriate, guess who does…

(uh, that would be your veterinarian, if you didn’t know.)

4.  Microchipping your pet could save their life.

It might sound extreme, but it’s the truth.  Imagine your pet gets lost – they may end up in a shelter, where they could be euthanized or adopted by another family if they aren’t microchipped.  That little $50 investment will tell the authorities where your pet really belongs!

5.  You play an important part in helping your pet have a good experience with the vet.  Start desensitization at home.

If you want a big gold star from your veterinarian, teach your pet to enjoy being touched all over, having their ears and muzzle manipulated, their mouth opened, and their tail lifted.  Teach your cat to think the carrier is fantastic.  And by all means, be sure your dog knows his manners (sit, stay, come, down, heel)!  These are first steps which will allow your pet have a fear-free experience at the vet.

6.  Cats need special treatment.

Many think that cats are low-maintenance pets, and that’s true to some extent.  But they have species-specific needs that must be addressed if they are going to live long, happy, healthy lives.

Environmental enrichment, mental stimulation, appropriate litter boxes, and places to scratch are just a few things to think about.  Medically speaking, you should know that cats are the masters of disguise.  They will keep disease hidden, and even if they are showing signs they will be very subtle.  Any changes in appetite, behavior, weight loss, or litter box habits must be brought to your vet’s attention right away.  And please, OH please, have your cat examined EVERY YEAR.

7.  Make your home environment safe for your pets.

Please keep prescription and over-the-counter medications completely out of reach.  Educate yourself on which foods and plants are toxic to pets.  Pet poisonings are one of the most common preventable emergencies seen by veterinarians, and we would love it if that were not the case.

8.  Marijuana is BAD for your dog.

Okay, this one is specific to Colorado, but important nonetheless!  Marijuana, in ANY form, is toxic to your dog.  If you notice your dog losing his balance, walking like he’s drunk, leaking urine or losing complete bladder control, take them to the vet right away.  And keep your stash, as well as any paraphernalia, far away from Fido.

9.  Don’t self-diagnose.  Dr. Google is not a good veterinarian.

There’s a ton of information out there on the internet…some good, and some not so good.  If you’re concerned about your pet, just call the vet.  Your vet’s knowledge, eyes, ears, fingers, and diagnostic tests are vastly superior to Dr. Google’s.

10.  Don’t wait too long to see your vet.

There is a good chance that whatever medical issue your pet is experiencing is not going to go away on its own.  And even if it might, your pet will suffer needlessly in the meantime.  Early intervention not only gives your pet the best prognosis and care, but could save you money in the long run.  And who doesn’t want to save money?

 

Do you have any questions or thoughts for Dr. D?  Leave ’em in the comments below!

Did you know that Dr. D does house calls in the Broomfield area?  If your pet needs to see the vet, give her a call!

Broomfield Vet Shares The Truth About Cat Healthcare

“Dear Dr. D,

My cat is a healthy, young adult who never goes outside.  I feed her a top quality food, and she is very happy.  But, she HATES the vet.  Are vaccines really necessary?

Sincerely,

BestCatOwner

 

I am going to tell you the truth, and I may be tarred and feathered by my colleagues for it, but here goes.

Your indoor adult cat does not need vaccines every year.  Once your kitten completes their initial series of vaccines, they don’t need them again for at least 3 years.  Your elderly (over 10 years old) indoor cat could probably go even longer without vaccines, as long as there aren’t any new cats coming into the home.  [Important disclaimer:  Rabies vaccine is required by law, of course, and should be performed every 3 years for cats.]

But, since you asked the question…  I’d like to take this opportunity to tell you a story.

Have you noticed the orange tabby cat in my profile picture over there to the right?  Here he is again:

This adorable kitty is a perfect example of a young, healthy adult who never goes outside.

This adorable kitty is a perfect example of a young, healthy adult who never goes outside.

 

For anonymity, let’s name him Buster.  🙂

Buster was about 4 years old when I saw him for the first time.  He was pretty healthy (just a tiny bit overweight), never went outside, ate a high quality food, and was up to date on all his vaccinations.  He was a perfect cat at home, happily lazing his days away as any cat should.

As his veterinarian, I performed a physical examination and recommended running a basic annual blood work panel (standard care in any veterinary practice, not to mention human medical practice).  And I’m so glad I did…

Buster’s blood work revealed a problem, lurking quietly under the happy, healthy facade.  He showed absolutely no clinical signs of the disease that was slowly developing within his body.

Buster was a diabetic. 

More specifically, he was pre-diabetic.  His body was starting to have problems regulating glucose, and without immediate intervention he was going to start showing clinical signs of full-blown diabetes.

I was so grateful that Buster’s owners were committed to allowing me to examine him and run blood work every year.  Had Buster been to see me once every 3 years, his diabetes would have progressed and he only would have been in to the clinic once he was very sick.

Instead, I was able to adjust Buster’s diet, put him on a weight loss plan, and monitor his disease.

Buster never progressed to full diabetes because of our early intervention. 

Buster is a wonderful success story, and only one example of what I want to tell every cat owner in the world:

The most important thing you can do for the health of your cat is have them examined by a veterinarian every year.

 

You’re probably thinking “Yeah, but Buster had a perfectly normal physical exam.  The blood work is what revealed his disease.”  And you are correct.  Here’s the truth: Any veterinarian worth their degree is going to recommend blood work for every pet they see as part of their annual physical.  It is imperative.  So just assume that “annual physical exam” = “blood work”.

I can tell you so many other stories about cats with underlying disease that owners never suspected…  kidney disease, irritable bowel syndrome, stress-induced cystitis, and arthritis…  all of which can be detected and addressed by your veterinarian during an annual exam.

Here’s the bottom line:  Your cat ages multiple “human years” for each of their cat years.  A 4-year-old cat is similar to a 30-year-old human, and a 7-year-old cat is similar to a 50-year-old human.  Do you think it would be okay to skip your physicals for 20 years?  Probably not.

 

 

Do you hate taking your cat to the vet?  Call Dr. D and avoid that trip altogether!  House calls are a great way to get your kitty the care they deserve without the stress of the car ride and veterinary clinic.

 

The Top 10 Reasons Why House Calls Are Awesome

10.  You don’t have to go anywhere.

There was a time, so long ago, when the doctor would come to your house, treat your illness, then have a cup of coffee with your family.  Up until recently, the only doctors who made house calls anymore were farm vets.  Now you have me, Dr. D – I will come to your house, take care of your pets, and leave you happier and less stressed out.  You don’t even have to give me a cup of coffee.

9.  You don’t have to get in the car.

Can’t drive?  Physical limitation?  Giant stubborn dog who won’t get in the car?  Little dog who vomits every time you drive them somewhere?  Multiple children (or just one) to cart around with you?  It’s tough sometimes.  As Bob Marley says, don’t worry about a thing.  Dr. D will come to you.

8.  It’s oh-so-convenient!

If you haven’t gotten that already with numbers 10 and 9, how about this – you pick the time and the day.  It can be while the kids are at school and before “Ellen” comes on.  It can be during nap time.  It can be when your spouse is home and you need to go out for a drink.  Whenever.  See?  Convenient!  Oh, and did you know that all of the medications I prescribe can be shipped right to your door?

7.  Less stress for you.

Ever been sitting in a waiting room while your dog is yanking on the leash and your child is knocking over a display?  Then you get stuck in a tiny exam room with your pet and your child, waiting what seems like eternity to be seen by someone?  Then your dog decides to do ‘his business’ on the floor because it smells like another dog, or your cat climbs into the cabinet and starts hissing like a fire-breathing dragon?  Yeah, me neither.

6.  No cat carriers.

This should be self-explanatory.

5.  You get your vet’s full attention.

In the clinic, my day was full of interruptions.  Emergencies, phone calls from specialists, technicians giving updates on hospitalized patients, the office manager needing to ask an urgent question…  These interruptions very commonly took me away from whatever dear client and pet I was treating at that moment.  I don’t know any veterinarian who wouldn’t love to give their full and undivided attention to each and every client and their pet.  But it is the nature of a busy clinic, and we vets are excellent at multitasking.  One reason why I love house calls is because I can finally give you my full attention.

4.  You and your pet get quality time with the vet.

If you wish, you can get to know me!  As the “other family doctor”, I think having a good relationship with your veterinarian grows from getting to spend time with them.  And I know for sure that your pet remembers me from one visit to the next…with less stressful house calls, I hope that they are actually happy to see me that next time!

3.  All your questions and concerns are answered.

I know how hard it is to feel like you have enough time to ask all your questions.  Any veterinarian will tell you that we would love to have all the time in the world to spend answering your questions, and properly educating you about nutrition, behavior, our recommendations, and why Buster eats poo.  Just one more reason why house calls are awesome.  I can answer questions to your (and my) heart’s content.

2.  Less stress for your pet.

My ultimate goal is fear-free veterinary visits for your furry angels.  Providing their veterinary care in the comfort of their own domain helps make this a reality.  


And… the Number 1 reason why house calls are AWESOME:

1.  Dr. D gets to spend time with you and your pets.

I know, the number one reason why house calls are awesome is really about MY enjoyment of the visit…but really, it is a benefit to you as well.  I LOVE what I do, and I LOVE getting to know you and your pets.  I LOVE getting to spend whatever amount of time I can with you, and I LOVE seeing you and your pet happy and stress-free at the end of our visit.  It’s a win-win.